Archive for the 'Raising $ for classrooms' Category

3rd Annual science education fundraiser LAUNCH!

Friday, October 1st, 2010

3rd Annual science education fundraiser LAUNCH!
Friday, October 1, 2010
Florida Citizens for Science News Release
Contact: Brandon Haught; bhaught@flascience.org
——————————————
FLORIDA SCIENCE EDUCATION NEEDS YOUR SUPPORT

Oct. 1, 2010 — Education budget woes felt throughout the state are preventing many teachers from obtaining necessary science equipment, thus crippling them at a time when a new set of science standards is demanding that they give students more in-depth science instruction. Florida Citizens for Science wants to lend a hand through its third annual fund raising campaign launched today.

Students in an elementary school class in St. Petersburg voted science their favorite subject, but they need the equipment to make the subject come alive outside of books. The teacher says that the science kits she wants will go a long way: “The best part is that they can be used year after year and will help countless students.”

A middle school teacher in Port St Lucie laments that her students want to do dissections but can’t due to lack of funds. “Our district is not able to buy science lab supplies so we make do with materials that can be gathered from home or very low cost,” she said.

A middle school teacher in Avon Park wants a life size skeleton for his students to get some hands-on learning. “Our state and county school system are going through a tremendous budget crunch,” he said. “There is no extra money for science supplies.”

Florida Citizens for Science asks everyone who cares about science education across the state to pitch in. Through the nonprofit online organization DonorsChoose.org, we have identified six Florida teachers who have asked for help in funding science education projects. We are asking concerned citizens to donate money to help these fundamental science projects become reality. Additionally, Florida Citizens for Science will match contributions dollar for dollar up to $600. So, if donators raise at least $600, we will double that to a total of $1,200. Of course, we encourage everyone to shoot past the $600 mark!

All donations are accepted and appreciated, regardless of the amount. Just visit our “giving page” at DonorsChoose to make your donation. The money raised stays right here in our state, benefiting our students’ science education. We hope to wrap up this fund raising project by Nov. 1.

Some of the schools we hope to assist:

  • New Heights Elementary School, St. Petersburg
  • Manatee Elementary School, Port St. Lucie
  • James Stephens Int’l Acad, Fort Myers
  • Avon Park Middle School, Avon Park
  • Sunset Park Elementary School, Windermere
  • Chets Creek Elementary School, Jacksonville

Last year we exceeded our fund raising goal, giving $1,775 to 13 schools. Let’s see if we can do that again! Here’s a series of blog posts about previous year’s efforts, including some thank you notes we got from kids.

Yup, we helped!

Friday, January 8th, 2010

Remember our 2nd annual fundraising project hosted here back in September? We raised $1,775 and helped 13 classrooms buy needed science education supplies. I want to share with you thank you letters from the teachers and the cool photos of students interacting with the new stuff.

Just Elementary School, Tampa shows us their new dissection kits.

Royal Palm Charter School, Palm Bay has some new class pets to study.

Lockhart Middle School, Orlando has students who are really “gellin”.

Ocean Palms Elementary School, Ponte Vedra Beach has first-graders going out of this world.

Now don’t those letters and photos make you feel all tingly inside?

Second annual fundraising wrap up

Friday, September 18th, 2009

We’re all done, folks! This year we gave a total of $1,775 to 13 classrooms across Florida for science education learning tools. (Last year we gave $1,507 to seven schools.) Here are the schools we helped this time and the kinds of stuff they now have because of you:

>> Pride Elementary School, Tampa (Owl Pellet, Owl Puke Workbook)
>> Chets Creek Elementary School, Jacksonville (Igneous Rock Collection, Rocks & Soil Book Library)
>> Kate Sullivan Elem School, Tallahassee (Hand Lens, Round 5″ Magnifier)
>> Florosa Elementary School, Mary Esther (Inclined Planes and Wedges, Stop Watches)
>> Lockhart Middle School, Orlando (Super Science Concoctions, Mixtures and Solutions)
>> Gibbons Street Elem School, Bartow (Simple Machines Activity Tub, Force & Motion Activity Tub)
>> Ocean Palms Elementary School, Ponte Vedra Beach (Solar System Floor Puzzle, Space Theme Book Library, Solar System Activity Tub)
>> Royal Palm Charter School, Palm Bay (Terrarium Set, Leopard Gecko, Tree Frog)
>> Franklin Park Magnet Elementary School, Fort Myers (Solar System Science Cards, Solar System Model)
>> Palmetto Elementary School, Poinciana (Butterfly Pavillion)
>> Kinnan Elementary School, Sarasota (Binoculars, Color Mixer Lab, Giant Thermometer)
>> Just Elementary School, Tampa (Dissection Sets)
>> East Milton Elementary School, Milton (Watch-It-Grow Window Greenhouse, Real Bugs Discovery Kit, Magnet Discovery Board)

This project was done through our DonorsChoose.org giving page.  Shall we do this again next year?

2nd Annual science education fundraiser LAUNCH!

Friday, August 7th, 2009

Florida Citizens for Science News Release
Contact: Brandon Haught; bhaught@flascience.org
——————————————
FLORIDA SCIENCE EDUCATION NEEDS YOUR SUPPORT

Aug. 7, 2009 — Education budget woes felt throughout the state are preventing many teachers from obtaining necessary science equipment, thus crippling them at a time when a new set of science standards is demanding that they give students more in-depth science instruction. Florida Citizens for Science wants to lend a hand through its second annual fund raising campaign launched today.

Florida’s updated science standards introduced new units of study to the second grade, prompting a Jacksonville teacher to request materials needed to give students hands-on experience with the required concepts. Meanwhile, a fifth grade class in Bartow has books about simple machines, force and motion, but the teacher worries that her kids at the low income school don’t have the supplies that would make the science subjects come alive and be memorable. She is concerned about preparing her students for the science FCAT.

One Orlando sixth grade life science teacher wants to give kids hands-on experience in life science and chemistry, but says: “The supplies are very limited in my school and my resources are minimal.”
A third grade teacher in Mary Esther echoes that thought in her request for science supplies: “The resources in a project are so important, and each student needs to participate. With the economy the way it is, buying the resources you need is very limited.”

Florida Citizens for Science asks everyone who cares about science education across the state to pitch in. Through the nonprofit online organization DonorsChoose.org, we have identified seven Florida teachers who have asked for help in funding science education projects. We are asking concerned citizens to donate money to help these fundamental science projects become reality. Additionally, Florida Citizens for Science will match contributions dollar for dollar up to $600. So, if donators raise at least $600, we will double that to a total of $1,200. Of course, we encourage everyone to shoot past the $600 mark!

All donations are accepted and appreciated, regardless of the amount. Just visit our “giving page” at DonorsChoose to make your donation. The money raised stays right here in our state, benefiting our students’ science education. We hope to wrap up this fund raising project by Sept 1.

Some of the schools we hope to assist:

>> Pride Elementary School, Tampa
>> Chets Creek Elementary School, Jacksonville
>> Kate Sullivan Elem School, Tallahassee
>> Florosa Elementary School, Mary Esther
>> Lockhart Middle School, Orlando
>> Gibbons Street Elem School, Bartow
>> Ocean Palms Elementary School, Ponte Vedra Beach

Last year we exceeded our fund raising goal, giving $1,507 to seven schools. Let’s see if we can do that again! Here’s a series of blog posts about last year’s efforts, including some thank you notes we got from kids.

###

You are so welcome!

Monday, November 10th, 2008

Students at Quail Hollow Elementary school sent Florida Citizens for Science a stack of thank you notes and pictures to show their appreciation for the microscopes we got them during our successful fundraising campaign back in August.

Here’s a sampling:

And here is what the teacher wrote in a thank you letter:

Dear Florida Citizens for Science,

The students have explored plant cells, insects and numerous other specimens using the microscopes. They have discovered a whole new world. Thank you for opening that world for them. They are constantly using them to explore the world around them and show each other what they have found. Thank you so much for your generosity.

Now don’t you feel are warm and fuzzy inside?

Final fundraising update

Sunday, September 7th, 2008

We did a great job raising funds to help out classroom science projects here in Florida. If you remember, we had a little more money to donate, so I asked you to make suggestions for what project to fund. Jeff Handy suggested in the previous thread’s comments the Spark an Eruption of Scientific Thought project at Cahoon Elementary School, Tampa. I’ve added the school to our DonorsChoose challenge page and made the donation, which finished funding the project after Jeff Handy had made his contribution.

That makes seven whole projects funded. Good job everyone! I believe that some of those teachers who benefited are now going to take pictures of the new equipment once they get it and also send some thank you letters. Whenever I get those, I will post what I can here.

Thank you to everyone who participated.

We did it!!

Friday, August 29th, 2008

Attention Florida science nuts: We did it!

Back on August 7, Florida Citizens for Science (FCS) launched a fundraising campaign focused on helping science education here in the Sunshine State. We worked through the DonorsChoose website where teachers propose classroom projects or equipment needs they can’t afford on their own or through the school system. FCS originally chose five science education projects proposed by Florida teachers and challenged you to make those wishes reality. The initial challenge had a target of raising $600 in donations and then FCS would match that amount, bringing the total to $1,200. Well, that was the original plan. Three weeks into the month-long challenge you donated much more than $600; you rocketed all the way to $912.

Since FCS still needed to add its promised $600 to the pot we added a sixth teacher project to our challenge. Today, FCS used that pledged $600 to push the challenge over the finish line a week early. All of our projects are now fully funded. Congratulations!

Here is what we did to help Florida science education:

  • Safety goggles are going to Claude Pepper Elem School, Miami.
  • Preserved animal specimens for biology “show and tell” are going to Edgewater High School, Orlando.
  • A set of magnets is going to Royal Palm Charter School, Palm Bay.
  • Five microscopes are going to Quail Hollow Elementary School, Wesley Chapel.
  • Impact cars, a projectile launcher and other related lab equipment is going to Avon Park.
  • A stereo microscope is going to Country Oaks Elementary School, Labelle.

We’re not done, though. FCS still has $116 left to spend of its pledged $600. So, you have one last homework assignment. Find one more project on the DonorsChoose website that we can use the last of our money on. I would prefer that we fully fund a project if one can be found that we can afford. Offer your picks in the comments here.

I hope you feel good about what we’ve done. I know I do!

Fundraising challenge week 1

Friday, August 15th, 2008

We just wrapped up our first week of fundraising for Florida science education with three more to go. Unfortunately, things are moving slow. We’ve only managed to round up $95 so far. Florida Citizens for Science will match that amount — getting us up to $190 — but that still doesn’t get us close to our total goal of $1,200.

Teachers really do need our help. This is not just some sappy sales pitch. It’s reality. Read this Orlando Sentinel story to see for yourself: Teachers ‘not going to get a penny’ in raises.

Though she has to watch her budget at home, Condrey spends at least $1,000 of her own money each year buying supplies for her classroom. Heathrow Elementary is in one of the most affluent neighborhoods in Central Florida, but plenty of low-income students need the pencils, paper, notebooks and other items she provides.

Condrey also buys special workbooks and other materials for her class to supplement what’s supplied by the school district. And when her allotment of paper for the copying machine is gone, she furnishes her own.

Kelly Leslie, a science teacher at Dr. Phillips High in Orange County for the past two years, previously taught in Pittsburgh, where she said teaching was a respectable profession at respectable pay. She makes $39,130 a year and said she’s not surprised so many Florida teachers quit.

Half of new teachers leave the profession in the first three years, said Frances Haithcock, chancellor of Florida schools. Many cite low pay as the reason.

The math is simple. When teachers suffer, their students suffer. One of the classrooms we are trying to help out during this fundraiser challenge is trying to do science experiments without basic safety equipment.

My students are extremely interested in science. With the adoption of a new science series came lots of materials to do classroom experiments, however, some basic materials were not included, such as the safety goggles, which are required for all experiments. This year I simply had to ask the students to be extremely careful and to not place their faces too close to the experiment.

I know you love science. The 68 comments so far on the “Evolution as Described by the Second Law of Thermodynamics” post attests to that. If you didn’t care, you wouldn’t be in there so often trying to educate certain other posters. This blog is not near as high-traffic as some other popular science blogs, but we still manage to draw in 120 to 200 visitors a day. If just a few of you folks out there would consider dropping five or ten bucks in the pot, we could build up a nice total in no time. And I know you folks visit plenty of other science sites, too. So, please spread the word. Chances are that there are Florida folks visiting those other sites who would appreciate knowing about this opportunity to help science education right here at home.

Week two is here. Let’s see if we can fully fund at least one of our classroom projects this week.