Monthly Archives: November 2008

Getting ready for “the e-word” in the Treasure Coast

A newspaper article turned up today concerning the schools in the Treasure Coast getting ready to incorporate evolution into the classroom lessons. There really isn’t much newsy to the story, but the online reader comment flamewars are certainly entertaining. This … Continue reading

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Counting birds

South Florida teams ready for Christmas Bird Count First conducted in 1900 with just 27 volunteers, the Christmas Bird Count has grown into an event involving thousands of people, one of the biggest and most venerable examples of citizen science … Continue reading

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Happy Thanksgiving!

Give Thanks? Science Supersized Your Turkey Dinner: Your corn is sweeter, your potatoes are starchier and your turkey is much, much bigger than the foods that sat on your grandparents’ Thanksgiving dinner table. Most everything on your plate has undergone … Continue reading

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Physics Talks Turkey This Thanksgiving — Tips From Science On How To Cook A Better Bird

 Whether you like dark or white meat, cooks can look to physics for some tips for making sure that Thanksgiving turkey is quickly gobbled up. McGee has two solutions to the this troublesome turkey problem. The first is a trusty … Continue reading

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Critical teacher shortages

During the next state board of education meeting, the need to address critical teacher shortages in certain teaching fields for the 2009-2010 school year will be discussed. This action item shows that “middle and high school level science” is one … Continue reading

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Pond scum in the classroom

The fifth-grade students learned some interesting hands-on stuff, but the teacher was a little … worried. Casey Turner watched as two buckets of fresh pond water — full of writhing bloodworms, mosquito larvae, water bugs and other aquatic wildlife — … Continue reading

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On this date:

On this day in 1859, On the Origin of Species by British naturalist Charles Darwin was first published.

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UCF becoming a debate hotspot

Eugenie Scott of the National Center for Science Education had visited UCF earlier this month to talk about evolution and the attempts to undermine evolution teaching in the public schools. Now a student group on the campus hosted their own … Continue reading

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